Phrases & Clauses

Age: Older Teens & Adults

The activity proposed for the song “DANCING QUEEN” is suggested after students have practiced Relative Pronouns/Clauses for some time. First, they guess the name of the song. Then, they listen to the song and find relative clauses in it. After that, they search information about the band and write them down using relative clauses.


Age: Teens & Adults

The song “THE ONLY THING THAT LOOKS GOOD ON ME IS YOU” is great to practice adjectives for describing clothes. Assuming they have already learned vocabulary related to clothes, show them pictures and words, so they can review them. They go over the vocabulary checking comprehension and pronunciation because after that, they will describe their favorite outfit to each other. Then, they watch the video of the song and write as many phrases as they can. After that, they listen to the song and underline the phrases the author uses to describe clothes. In the end, students discuss how they relate to fashion and shopping for clothes.


Age: Adults

The song “A GROOVY KIND OF LOVE” is about Zero Conditionals. Before listening and assuming students have already practiced the structure for some time, the teacher shows them a slide with adjectives and asks what they do when they feel that way. After sharing with a peer, they listen to the song and find out what the author does to cope with his feelings. Finally, they write about themselves.


Age: Teens

The activity proposed for the song “COMPLICATED” aims to practice talking about feelings. First, students guess (from a list provided by the teacher) which adjectives they are going to be able to infer from the lyrics. Then, they listen to the song and find out whether they were right. After that, they say why the author is upset and also list the things that make them feel upset. Finally, they share their sentences with a peer.


 Age: Older Teens & Adults

The song “YOU LEARN” is great to practice Time Clauses. First, students complete a sentence provided by the teacher. Then, they listen to the song and reflect on the author´s opinion. After that, they write sentences that reflect their opinion and finally they share them with their peers.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

Although “SOMEONE LIKE YOU” is good to practice the simple past, we can practice Relative Clauses as well. First, based of a list of biographical information, students in pairs talk about the author. Then, they listen to the song and guess what it is about. After that, they read the lyrics again and use relative clauses to describe the song or the author. Finally, they say what they think about Adele´s music and the kind of music they personally like.


Age: Adults

The song “THE WINNER TAKES IT ALL” allows us to focus on, at least, two different things.

OPTION 1: First, students guess the name of the song. Then, they listen to the song and fill in the blanks with words that rhyme. After that, they google the words they don´t know and list them in order of difficulty.

OPTION 2: First, students guess the name of the band. Then, they listen to the song and guess what the author compares a relationship to. After that, they answer a couple of questions and express their opinion using the structure suggested, which is Time Clauses.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

This is a simple task to practice Relative Pronouns. For the song “I’M BLUE” students work on a puzzle to review the structure. Then, they listen to the song and find relative clauses in it. After that, they personalize the struture by writing sentences about themselves.

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