Guessing

Age: Adults

The song “GOOD LUCK CHARM” can be used if the lesson is about Superstitions. After practicing the vocabulary for awhile, students guess which good luck charms they think they will find in the song. Then, they listen to the song and check. Finally, they talk about superstitions of their own.


Age: Adults

The activity designed for the song “BLACK COFFEE” aims to wrap up a lesson about Drinking Habits (in Brazil, some people have a cup of coffee after a meal.) First, students engage into a conversation about coffee and their drinking habits. Then, they listen to the song and guess why the author has been drinking so much coffee. After that, they check and finally, they look up the words they don´t know and write them down in order of difficulty.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The goal here is to guess the meaning of the song “A BEAUTIFUL LIE”. First, students watch the video of the song (with no sound) and say what they think. Then, they listen to the song and read the lyrics in order to check wether they were right. After that, they discuss in pairs and say what “a beautiful lie” means.


Age: Adults

The song “SAY WHAT YOU NEED TO SAY” allows us to practice Wishes & Regrets, Modals of Advice and Would Like. First, students say what they know about the author. Then, they are told that the song they are about to listen to was written for a film. They watch the video of the song and guess what the film is about. Finally, they write a Bucket List and share them with their peers.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The song “I CAN´T LIE” is nice to be played for older teenagers (they will even sing along) and adults of course.  First, they work on some vocabulary that will enable them to engage into a conversation. Then, they listen to the song and fill in the blanks. Finally, they wrap the activity up talking about relationships and sharing personal experiences.


The song “ANGEL´S LULLABY” is a love song and I would show it to my adult students. It´s a good song when the topic is Family. First, students read a quote from the song and guess what it is about. Then, they listen to the song and guess who the author has written it to and explain their choice. Finally, the teacher shows them the video so they can check. In the end, there may be a discussion in small groups about how well students get along with their family.


Age: Teens & Adults

The song “NEXT YEAR” can be used to practice Going To to talk about resolutions. First, students write down at least three resolutions they have in mind for next year. Then, they guess what the author´s resolutions are by filling in the blanks. After that, they listen and check. Finally, they write their own version of the song and record an audio.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The activity designed for the song “I WISH YOU WERE HERE” is very simple. It´s just a guessing game. First, students learn about the author by taking a short quiz. Then, they listen to the song and find out its name. Finally, they list the words they learned in order of difficulty.


Age: Adults

“YOU’RE THE VOICE” is a song for reflection. First, students read four definitions for four different types of citizens and they do the matching. After that, they decide what kind of citizen each one of them is and share it with a peer. Then, they read the lyrics and fill in the blanks with suitable words. Next, they listen to the song and check the words. Finally, they engage into a discussion about events that took place around the world at some point in history.


 Age: Older Teens & Adults

The task suggested for the song “FIX YOU” is the following: First, students say what they may know about the band. Then, they guess what goes in 9 blanks. After that, they listen to the song and check. Finally, with the help of I-pads (provided by the teacher), they google their favorite song, copy and paste it to an editing document and delete five to ten easy words for their peers to guess.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The tasks suggested for the song “MY CHURCH” are simple and aim to wrap up a lesson on analogies. First, students have to explain the analogies provided by the teacher. Then, they listen to the song and guess what the author compares driving around in a car to. After that, they guess the name of the song and finally, they discuss a few questions in pairs or small groups.


Age: Adults

“AIN´T THAT A KICK IN THE HEAD” is an oldie, so it´s best if you play it for adults only. The ultimate goal here is have students infer meaning from the lyrics, based on some vocabulary. First, they tell each other what they may know about three specific singers. Then, they listen to the song and guess which of the three sings the song. After that, based on the lyrics, they choose the correct option for three items provided by the teacher.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The activity designed for the song “FAST CAR” is an excuse to wrap up a lesson on Transportation. First, students share what they think the benefits of having a car are. Then, they read the lyrics and fill in the blanks with any suitable words. After that, they listen to the song and check whether they were right. Finally, based on the lyrics, they say how they think the author feels and whether they have ever felt the same way.


Age: Older Teens

The activity designed for the song “BLANK SPACE” is rather simple. First, students answer a question by choosing from three options. Then, they listen to the song and based on the lyrics and on what they already know about the author, they try to guess which option she would choose.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

Although the song “SHAKE IT OFF” aims at a young audience, the lyrics can be used in an adult learner class which is studying the topic Celebrities. The song is the way the author found to respond to public criticism and scrutiny. She also does that in the song “BLANK SPACE”. The activity proposed here is simple. First, they guess who the author is, based on clues provided by the teacher. Then, they listen to the song and find out its title and how the author responds to criticism. Finally, they share how they deal with criticism in general.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The activity for the song “FOCUS” is the same proposed for the song “SHAKE IT OFF”. First, students guess who the singer is based on a few clues provided by the teacher. Then, they listen to the song and find out its name  and how she deals with criticism. Finally, they say how they react to criticism in general.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The activity proposed here can be done with any song. The song chosen this time is “HAZARD”.

Select twelve to fourteen words from the song and make a list from which students will choose 9. They write them down in a grid and listen to the song. Every time they hear a word, they cross it out. The winner is the student who crosses out three words in a row. After that, they guess what the song is about, based on the words they have in the grid. Finally, they watch the video of the song and find out.


Age: Adults

The song “FUCK YOU” allows us to work on vocabulary practice and inferring meaning. First, students are asked what reasons motivate song writes to write. After they share their opinion, they listen to the song and guess what made the author write this particular song. Then, they work on a vocabulary comprehension task and finally, they personalize it.


Age: Older Teens & Adults

The activity proposed for the song “DON´T WORRY ´BOUT A THING” is the same for the song “Beautiful Life”. First, students discuss whether they are optimistic or pessimistic about life. Then, they listen to the song and find out about the author. They will also be able to guess the name of the song. Finally, they share what the author suggests that we do in order to keep positive about life.


Age: Adults

The song “HELP” is an opportunity for students to practice describing personalities. First, they say what kind of personality they think the performer has. Then, they listen to the song and find out its name. After that, and based on the lyrics, they say what the author was like in the past and what he is like now. Finally, they surf the net to find out who the author is.


Age: Adults

The song “PHOTOGRAPH” is good to wrap up a lesson on Relative Causes or Inferring Meaning. First, students take a quiz and share their answers with a peer. Then, they fill in the blanks with suitable words. After that, they listen to the song and check whether they are right about the words they used. Next, they reflect on the relationship described in it and guess what kind of relationship that is. In the end, they find at least 5 relative clauses in it and personalize them.