Hazard: Simple Past 2

Age: Older Teens & Adults

Here is another possible way to work with the song “HAZARD”. First, students work on the Simple Past of a few verbs which happen to be in the lyrics and share them with a peer. Then, they listen to the song and fill in the blanks provided with the same verbs. After that, based on the lyrics, they guess what it is about and finally watch the video of the song to check whether they were right.

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When I Was A Boy

Age: Older teens & Adults

The activity suggested for the song “WHEN I WAS A BOY” is a guided writing task. First, students write three sentences about their childhood. Then, they listen to the song and find out about the author´s childhood. After that, they review the use of Simple Past, Used To and Would to talk about past habits and write sentences about the author. Finally they write a paragraph about their childhood using the structure suggested.

Everybody Loves Somebody

Age: Adults

The activity proposed for the song “EVERYBODY LOVES SOMEBODY” allows students to practice the Simple Past. First, students share what they know about the singer. After that, they are given fragments of biographical information (about the singer) to be put together and shared with the whole class. Then, they listen to the song and guess its name. Finally, they prepare a 2-5 minute presentation about their favorite singer.

Crying

Age: Adults

The song “CRYING” can be used to engage students into a discussion on Breaking up and also focus on the Simple Past.

OPTION 1: First,  students work on a puzzle to find the past form of the verbs in the song. Then, they listen to the song and fill in the blanks with the verbs found in the puzzle. Finally, they fill in a chart with the verbs in order to consolidate the past form.

OPTION 2: First, students talk for some minutes about Breaking up. Then, they listen to the song and find out who ended the relationship. Finally, assuming the song is a letter, they write a reply to it.

Because You Loved Me

Age: Adults

The song “BECAUSE YOU LOVED ME” has verbs in the past. This activity can be used with any song with verbs in the past. First, students complete a sentence. Then, they listen to the song and underline the verbs in the past. After that, they fill in a chart with the verbs they found and practice pronunciation. Finally they play ping pong.The instructions for the game are in the powerpoint slides.

Hazard: Creative Writing

Age: Older Teens & Adults

Creative Writing is also something that can be done with the song “HAZARD” . First, assuming students have learned and practiced the past form of the verbs for some time, students write the past of verbs present in the lyrics. After that, they write a short story of their own using the same verbs. After sharing their stories, they listen to the song and fill in the blanks. To wrap the activity up, they say what they think the song is about and watch the video, so they can check whether they were right.

Hazard: Simple Past

Age: Older Teens & Adults

The song “HAZARD” allows us to focus on the use of the Simple Past. First, based on a list of different items, students say what they are used for. The purpose of this task is provide students with vocabulary, so they are able to talk about the song later. Then, they listen to the song and by focusing on the verbs in the past, they try to guess what it is about. At this point, they still won´t know, so they finally watch the video of the song, which will leave no doubt. Afterwards, they answer questions about the video.

Come Fly With Me

Age: Older Teens & Adults

Students must have practiced the past form of ther verbs before this activity. For the song “COME FLY WITH ME”, first they guess the answers the teacher would give for a travel quiz. Then, they share their own answers in pairs. After that, they listen to the song and find out where the author traveled to. Finally, they write about a trip they took.

Someone Like You

Age: Older Teens & Adults

Although “SOMEONE LIKE YOU” is good to practice the simple past, we can practice Relative Clauses as well. First, based of a list of biographical information, students in pairs talk about the author. Then, they listen to the song and guess what it is about. After that, they read the lyrics again and use relative clauses to describe the song or the author. Finally, they say what they think about Adele´s music and the kind of music they personally like.